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The Metal Analysis of Dog Food Public Deposited

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MLA citation style

Clinton, Hannah. The Metal Analysis of Dog Food. Neal, Brad.University of Indianapolis. 2016. https://uindy.hykucommons.org/concern/generic_works/162cf8a4-fcfa-4814-9b8f-b860ddd7d6c5?locale=en

APA citation style

Clinton, Hannah. (2016). The Metal Analysis of Dog Food. https://uindy.hykucommons.org/concern/generic_works/162cf8a4-fcfa-4814-9b8f-b860ddd7d6c5?locale=en

Chicago citation style

Clinton, Hannah. The Metal Analysis of Dog Food. University of Indianapolis. 2016. https://uindy.hykucommons.org/concern/generic_works/162cf8a4-fcfa-4814-9b8f-b860ddd7d6c5?locale=en

Note: These citations are programmatically generated and may be incomplete.

Packaged dry kibble is the main source of nutrients for most household dogs. As such, it is important that kibble contains proper amounts of various metals necessary for biological functions including ATP production, maintaining the proper biochemical gradient across cell membranes, and respiration. Therefore, the concentrations of specific metals in various brands of dog food were analyzed using the microwave plasma -atomic emission spectrometer (MP-AES) via an adapted methodology that can now be applied to future, similar undergraduate research projects. Because of their critical roles in maintaining the functionality of the body, sodium, potassium, magnesium, iron, and calcium were chosen to be the focus of this study. The elemental concentrations determined by the methodology using the MP-AES were compared to the accepted concentration guidelines put forth by the American Association of Feed Control Officials (AAFCO). Based on the importance of each metal and how closely each food's concentration of metals compared to the AAFCO recommended values, the dog foods were assessed.

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