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The Effects of Hair Color and Gender on Judgments of Warmth and Competence Public Deposited

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Welch, Taylor. The Effects of Hair Color and Gender On Judgments of Warmth and Competence. Boucher, Kathryn.University of Indianapolis. 2017. https://uindy.hykucommons.org/concern/generic_works/0920d09f-90fb-490b-9f38-2525860860a9?locale=en

APA citation style

Welch, Taylor. (2017). The Effects of Hair Color and Gender on Judgments of Warmth and Competence. https://uindy.hykucommons.org/concern/generic_works/0920d09f-90fb-490b-9f38-2525860860a9?locale=en

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Welch, Taylor. The Effects of Hair Color and Gender On Judgments of Warmth and Competence. University of Indianapolis. 2017. https://uindy.hykucommons.org/concern/generic_works/0920d09f-90fb-490b-9f38-2525860860a9?locale=en

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Hair color and gender are two factors that are seldom studied together in snap judgment research of impressions of others. However, past research suggests that women are more frequently stereotyped in regards to their hair color. Some of these stereotypes include the "dumb blonde" and "fiery redhead" stereotypes. In a mixed model design study, I expected there to be a difference between judgments of warmth and competence based on these gender stereotypes. While I expected warmth and competence differences between hair colors across genders, I expected these warmth and competence differences to be greater for pictured women than pictured men. I also predicted that judgments would be influenced by participants' own gender such that males would be more likely to judge according to stereotypes than females. To test these hypotheses, I presented participants with pictures of novel people of varying hair colors and different genders, and these individuals are people that the participants have never seen before and would likely never interact with. Participants gave their judgments of them. The results of this study show that gender and hair color do have an effect on people's judgments of warmth and competence, as well as intended behaviors toward individuals. Red-haired females were judged as warmer and more competent than the other hair colors. Males were overall judged significantly lower than females in terms of warmth, competence, and intended behaviors. All significant interactions between target hair color and target gender were driven by the red-haired group. Future research should look more closely at the differences between males and female participants' judgments.

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